Board Game Mania

Nothing quite captures a childhood of the 60s, 70s, and 80s quite like board games. While many board games are now brushed aside, reserved only for the occasional family game night or dinner party, these cardboard fun factories used to be the talk of the town not too long ago. Before they were replaced by video games and the latest technology, children would gather round the kitchen table on a Friday or Saturday evening spending some quality time together solving puzzles, mysteries, or ways to accrue the most funds. To this day, online retailers like eBay and Etsy continue to sell vintage board games. Here are 3 of the most popular games to date.

Monopoly-Logo

Monopoly: Still immensely popular today, Monopoly has been licensed in more than 103 countries and printed in more than 37 languages. The game was originally built upon the economic principals of Henry George, an American journalist, philosopher, and political economist. His most influential work extended to areas of land value tax and the value capture of lang and natural resources. The current Parker Brothers edition was released in 1935 fused with fast property trade, negotiations, and resource management.

Life-logo

The Game of Life (LIFE): LIFE is a board game originally released in the 1860s by Milton Bradley; however, the height of its popularity occurred later in the 1960s when major adjustments were made to fit modern times. The game simulates the life of an average American as they progress through various education and career paths, life and family choices, eventually leading to old age and retirement. The game is currently featured in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

chutes-ladders

Chutes and Ladders: Originally an ancient Indian board game called “Snakes and Ladders” in which two or more players navigate the game according to the roll of a die, hindered or helped by snakes and ladders respectively, Milton Bradley created their own rendition in 1952. The overarching theme is fairly similar with the added element of moral rewards; depictions of good deeds such as planting flowers are accompanied by a ladder while bad deeds, ergo playing a trick, is accompanied by a chute.

What were some of your favorite games growing up?